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What's New in the Caribbean

11 Mar

What's New in the Caribbean

If you ask what could be new in the Caribbean in 2022, there is plenty. You see, with the years of pandemic fear and devastation, the people of the Caribbean are ready for more again! It is no big secret that the Caribbean islands' primary source of economic growth is the tourism industry. But the pandemic put a catastrophic hold on that industry, as you know. 

The good news is that investors, hoteliers, and travelers are ready for the new and to get back to travel again. Here are some of the things happening in the Caribbean to help tourism come back soon! 

  1. The islands are encouraging return visitors and new ones. 
  2. St. Croix has invested millions in revitalization, including new piers and boats. 
  3. Developers have invested heavily in the growth of some of the Caribbean islands. 
  4. More housing is being developed as well as new forms of hospitality like glamping sites. 
  5. St. Lucia has added 20,000 new air seats from the US to the islands. And they have new resorts being developed too. 
  6. Aruba is ramping up accommodations on the island and encourages "happy workcations." 
  7. Airports are expanding. 
  8. Cruise ships are beginning to come back with all new and improved health protocols on board. 
  9. From Bermuda, you can take a "cruise to nowhere," for a safe cruise with folks already on the island. 
  10. And Ambergris Cay is expanding to include new suites, a clubhouse, and additional restaurants. 
  11. American Airlines launched the first non-stop flight from Miami to Dominica and Anguilla. 
  12. Anguilla's Blowing Point Ferry terminal is currently under construction. 
  13. The Dominican Republic is investing heavily in hotels. 
  14. Tobago is investing in airport expansion and increased flights to and from. 

With all these improvements and expansions, the Caribbean hopes to gain back their loyal visitors and new ones. The whole world is ready to travel again, and the Caribbean is preparing for record travel years ahead. 

CITED: caribjournal.com, newyorktimes.com